Friday, February 03, 2012

Using CommVault 1-touch restore

I have been attempting on and off for a few weeks to get CommVault's "Virtualize Me" feature working in my environment. My environment is a little unique in the fact that the DR VMware systems are isolated from the CommServe. Because the CommServe needs access to Virtual Center to use Virtualize Me, there is a problem. We looked at differnt options such as moving servers and creating static NAT rules, but none of them were very flexible or secure.

A little searching and I found a great post about CommVault 1-Touch. Virtualize Me is essentially 1-Touch, but automated for VMware deployments. The benefit of 1-Touch is that it is used to restore to any system, not just VMware.

To use 1-Touch you have to pre-create and configure the VM hardware (CPU, RAM, disk, network, etc...) Then boot to the ISO and walk through the setup process..

Step-by-step recovery processes can be found at http://blog.lewan.com/2011/12/04/commvault-1-touch-bare-metal-restore-to-vmware-vm/

Another method to extract music from YouTube

Previously I created a post that described how to extract music from YouTube using a variety of Linux tools. I am getting ready for a road-trip and needed some theme music (Mustang Sally, Slow Ride, etc...), but didnt have a Linux system available. So here is another method using Windows tools.

DISCLAIMER: I am not fully aware of the legality of this. I am assuming that it is OK since I am not doing any hacking or breaking of cryptography, but your mileage may vary.

Tools needed

Step 1: Find the video you want
This is the easy part, just search YouTube for the video you want. 
It may be a good idea to listen to it before hand to ensure it is the version you want. There are a lot of remixes and covers by other bands (professional or otherwise). You wouldn't want to download a heavy metal song and find out later that its a polka remix

Step 2: Download the video
Use Free YouTube Download to download the video to your computer. I found the default quality and format settings to work fine.

Step 3: Extract the audio

Using VLC, walk through the Convert process to extract the music as an MP3.
If you have a lot of files, you can use the following command to bulk convert them.
for %i in (*.mp4) do "c:\program files\videolan\vlc\vlc.exe" "%i" --sout #transcode{acodec=mp3}:duplicate{dst=std{access=file,mux=raw,dst=\""%i.mp3"\"},select=\"novideo\"} vlc://quit

Wednesday, February 01, 2012

Monitoring wireless networks

I just rebuilt my laptop and was in the process of reinstalling all my normal tools (7zip, Chrome, wireshark, etc...) I suddenly remembered that I had a great wireless monitoring tool that allowed me to see what networks were nearby, what channel they were on, and how strong their signals were over time, but I couldn't remember its name.

A little googling and I found it - inSSIDer (http://www.metageek.net/products/inssider/).

The really great thing however, is that I found several other methods to do the same thing. For my Android phone there is WiFi Analyzer (http://a.farproc.com/wifi-analyzer), and Windows can even perform similar tasks natively by running netsh wlan show networks mode=bssid